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EPA Survey shows $271 billion needed for Nation's Wastewater Infrastructure


EPA Survey Shows $271 Billion Needed for Nation’s Wastewater Infrastructure


WASHINGTON — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released a survey showing that $271 billion is needed to maintain and improve the nation’s wastewater infrastructure, including the pipes that carry wastewater to treatment plants, the technology that treats the water, and methods for managing stormwater runoff.

The survey is a collaboration between EPA, states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and other U.S. territories. To be included in the survey, projects must include a description and location of a water quality-related public health problem, a site-specific solution, and detailed information on project cost.

“The only way to have clean and reliable water is to have infrastructure that is up to the task,” said Joel Beauvais, EPA’s Acting Deputy Assistant Administrator for Water. “Our nation has made tremendous progress in modernizing our treatment plants and pipes in recent decades, but this survey tells us that a great deal of work remains.”
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Governor Brown's budget includes $3.5 million for Delta Tunnels

http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2016/1/7/1467132/

State officials deny any money targeted for controversial tunnels  READ MORE »

U.S. EPA Requires J.R. Simplot Company to Reduce Emissions at Sulfuric Acid Plant in San Joaquin Valley

 

 

SAN FRANCISCO – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Justice has announced a settlement with the J.R. Simplot Company that will resolve a Clean Air Act enforcement case involving its sulfuric acid plant near Lathrop, Calif.

Under the settlement, Simplot will spend over $40 million on pollution controls that will significantly cut sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions at a total of five acid plants in three states: the Lathrop facility and two plants each in Pocatello, Idaho, and Rock Springs, Wyo. Once implemented, the settlement will reduce SO2 emissions from Simplot’s five plants by more than 50 percent, approximately 2,540 tons per year of reductions. Simplot will carry out a plan to monitor SO2 emissions continuously at all five facilities.

The company will pay a civil penalty of $899,000 and has agreed to fund an environmental mitigation project valued at $200,000 to reduce particulate matter pollution in the San Joaquin Valley. This special project with the San Joaquin Air Pollution Control District will provide incentives to residents living in the San Joaquin Valley to replace or retrofit inefficient, higher-polluting wood-burning stoves and fireplaces with cleaner-burning, more energy-efficient appliances.  READ MORE »

Department of Interior announces a new website which monitors drought on the Colorado River

WASHINGTON – On the heels of a White House Roundtable on Water Innovation, the U.S. Department of the Interior today (Dec. 16, 2015) launched a new, interactive website to show the dramatic effects of the 16-year drought in the Colorado River Basin. The specialized web tool, otherwise known as Drought in the Colorado River Basin – Insights Using Open Data, shows the interconnected results of a reduced water supply as reservoir levels have declined from nearly full to about 50 percent of capacity.  READ MORE »

Clean Water, Clean Power - the Case for Solar Floatovoltaics

By Emma Bailey

  Human-caused climate change is a very real and urgent threat to all life on this planet. The rapidly worsening issue of global warming requires an immediate switch to energy sources which generate far fewer emissions during production.  According to the stabilization wedge theory, we already have the means to get climate change “under control.” The theory surmises that we can and should use a variety of conservation and energy production methods, rather than rely on a single "silver bullet.” Implementing the recommendations of this theory, however, will call for new and ingenious approaches to all aspects of the power production cycle.

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Alarming amounts of mercury and selenium found in Grand Canyon watershed

  A new study, published in the scientific journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, has found mercury and selenium in the Grand Canyon segment of Colorado River at concentrations “sufficient to pose exposure risks for fish, wildlife, and humans.”  READ MORE HERE:  http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/the-grand-canyon-has-an-alarming-amount-of-mercury-and-selenium-7610875.

  Read the full report at: http://images.phoenixnewtimes.com/media/pdf/walters_et_al-2015-environmental_toxicology_and_chemistry.pdf

 

 

 

 

Retiring Toxic CA Farmland Better Deal Than Tunnels

SPECIAL REPORT: tunnels map
Retiring Toxic Farmland in Western San Joaquin Valley Would Save Water, Environment and Taxpayer Money

Land retirement 25x cheaper than Tunnel plan and could save 450,000 acre-feet of water

Sacramento, CA – A new report by EcoNorthwest, an independent economic analysis firm, estimates that 300,000 acres of toxic land in the Westlands Water District and three adjacent water districts could be retired at a cost of $580 million to $1 billion.  READ MORE »

Photosynthesis Power: Algae as a Green, Clean, Energy Source

 

By Emma Bailey

 

Water continues to be the source of all life-giving power. The microorganisms which formed petroleum were, of course, first found beneath the sea bed; however the harmful, expensive and dirty process of their extraction negates most if not all benefits of their continued use. Algae, also typically found in aquatic environments, may seem to be an unlikely candidate for energy generation. However, these waterborne organisms, capable of cleaning wastewater while also providing a viable source of biofuel, might be the clean, “renewable” energy source we’ve all been looking for.

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LA Times editorial says GOP proposed water bill in Congress is a bad idea

  If you are wondering about the wisdom and costs of a California water bill being proposed in Congress by Hanford Congressman David Valadao, then you should definitely read the Los Angeles Times editorial on the subject.  Here is the link:

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/editorials/la-ed-water-bills-20150710-sto...

Fitch Ratings says a California appellate court ruling is likely to have limited impact on tiered-water pricing

28 April 2015

   A court ruling reinforcing the requirement that California water utilities link their tiered fees to the cost of providing water may reduce revenue and increase compliance costs slightly for a few but will likely have limited credit impact, Fitch Ratings says. Nearly all Fitch-rated water utilities in the state use tiered water rate pricing. Those that have sufficiently justified their tiered water pricing based on direct cost recovery of capital, conservation programs, higher treatment, and purchased water costs will see limited impacts. However, some may be required to re-examine their rate structures, undergo more rigorous analysis of cost of service, and provide greater rate transparency going forward.  READ MORE »

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